Writing

NeuroCommunication

Three years ago, I discovered a fascinating relationship between the way our brains process information and how we speak, write and listen. Since then our Presenting with Influence, Writing with Influence and Connecting Through Listening workshops have helped thousands of business professionals like you to increase their performance in all aspects of communication.

In our talks and workshops we show how neurological preferences drive communication behaviour - and that each of us has unique communication biases that we can easily recognize and learn to overcome. I’ve always thought that this innovative approach merits its own term and last month I had a flash of inspiration and came up with a new word: NeuroCommunication

I believe that it captures perfectly the exciting work that we do - I hope that it resonates with you as well!


Elon Musk on acronyms

Elon Musk

"Excessive use of made up acronyms is a significant impediment to communication and keeping communication good as we grow is incredibly important. Individually, a few acronyms here and there may not seem so bad, but if a thousand people are making these up, over time the result will be a huge glossary that we have to issue to new employees. No one can actually remember all these acronyms and people don't want to seem dumb in a meeting, so they just sit there in ignorance. This is particularly tough on new employees."

"The key test for an acronym is to ask whether it helps or hurts communication."

 

Selected text from a May 2010 email to SpaceX employees